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Posts tagged ‘color’

New Hampshire ‘Color Love’

opening postcard web 5x5 GWren

Two artist friends and I are showing our work together this September!
‘Color Love’– 3 artists 3 visions is a 3-person show of our colorful artworks– intensely-colored abstract watercolor collages by Ethel Hills, bold impressive wildlife-inspired paintings by Rosemary Conroy, and my Ann Trainor Domingue New England life inspired paintings and watercolors. It promises to be a wonderful exhibit of three very different takes on ‘Color Love’ –where we each  internalize how color influences our work–and then create an inspiring variety of images for you to see and feel, and then possibly find an artwork so special you must take it home!

Please join us at the opening reception on Friday, September 7th, 5-7 at the Gallery at WREN in Bethlehem, New Hampshire.

 

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Blame It On New England

Delicately Powerful

Our local florist shop, Apotheca Tea Shoppe and Flowers in Goffstown, New Hampshire, allowed me to browse and spend an afternoon sketching and photographing (actually taking snapshots) of their beautiful displays of flowers. Quite a colorful afternoon it was. I was developing a new series paintings using flowers, florists, gardeners as my inspirations.

gerber redspeonies In following with my decidedly unconventional approach to design and color, I was looking to work with the color, forms, patterns and textures in an uncommon way. A way that would have viewers say, hmmm, I’ve never seen that before. I was doing as much thinking as photographing and sketching during this process. I don’t begin a process like this with preconceived notions of what I am going to do with the information. What fun would that be? Of course I realize plenty of artists pre-think and I find myself overthinking frequently. But this time I tried NOT to solve the puzzle ahead of time.

I am a bit demanding of my muse–whenever she shows up–I want to have plenty of input for her to work with. A couple of the florists at the shop wound up being part of my inquiry as well although not my intention of using them in this work. But I never know. Even the worst photo can offer the best idea for a painting. 

The photos shown above are great as a reference for shapes, colors, flower angles, reflections and refractions of stems through glass. Not perfect lighting conditions for copying exactly what is shown but more than enough information for me to use to incorporate into a fresh design.

sketches20150306_125047     20150306_151725

The concept of design is first and foremost in my mind when I approach new work. I enjoy the quick process of sketching possibilities for a larger piece. I feel at during this stage I am efficiently running  through ideas before I ‘waste’ time working large on a weakly designed idea. Again my background in graphic design and advertising concepts fit seamlessly into my process.

The final artwork shown below was inspired by this process along with twenty others for a recent show titled, ‘Sunstrokes’. Less detail, sketchy in its application of paint. Not looking labored over. Fresh. Direct. Friendly.

Can’t wait to get back to the studio.

(‘Redheads’, 12×12, acrylic on panel, available at Sullivan Framing, Bedford, NH.)

15407 Redheads acryl fabr canv 12x12 sm

Bloomin’ Tunes Together

Quick note about starting a new painting series while retaining some of your current art work elements.

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Listening to All That Jazz

comparison Mar 2015 smThis post is a recent lesson in listening–no, not to jazz music, but to the sounds of my own improvised thoughts. Hearing what the painting is trying to tell me as I add my part to the conversation–lines, color, shapes, forms, textures. Instead of a straightforward journey this one turned into a ride down a windy country road. Finishing up at a quiet place. Click on the image below to read the details of just how this journey evolved.  And please feel free to share this post or go to my website to see new works.  www.anntrainordomingue.com

In With the New

patterns in the underbrush

Between the Seasons, 24×24, acrylic on panel

Seasonal transitions in New England are not so subtle hints that change is in the offing. Temperatures rising or lowering dramatically, colors intensifying or diminishing, textures smoothing or coarsening, sounds echoing or softening. Heading into winter or welcoming spring are the transitions that I look forward to each and every year. They find their way into my artworks in both subtle and obvious ways through more vibrant or subdued colors, understated or bolder forms, quieter or busier textures, and complex or simplified patterns. This particular painting known as Coming Solstice or Between the Seasons is a reflection on the landscape forms that surround me as well as my use of them in building a painting. It is the start of a new season and this approach will be the beginning of a new series of work for 2015. Hope you have great things on tap for the coming New Year.

Gravity of Grays

P1130888

I love grays–they are very important colors–foggy, charcoal, steel, cool, warm, and Cape Cod grays. But what I really like in this snapshot is how gray creates background tones that contrast beautifully with all kinds of colors. From turquoise to soft peach to warm orange as in this photo. The various tones of grays of the shingles, boats, sand and misty air all combined to form an unusual color combination and one that I will be exploring in my paintings this winter.

Spirit of Grit / In the City

Spirit of Grit, In the City

Final painting revised months after I thought it was complete.

As a Copley Artist member I have an opportunity to submit artwork to planned exhibitions. Most recently a call for entries arrived called “GRIT-the urban landscape”. I almost dismissed the idea of entering as my work usually is nature-based with simple structures–certainly not gritty and city-based. The more I thought about it the more I was intrigued by the idea of taking this theme and interpreting it my own way.

version 1

First effort: 48″x24″ Black, grays and touches of warm tones as taillights or street lines.

version 2 48"x24"

Second effort on top of first effort.

My first attempt to sort out my approach is shown here a the left. Bold structure-like forms with window shapes and reflections interconnecting and overlapping in a similar way to how my brain feels when I go into any city especially for the first time. I may a well have jumped into the middle of a weaving loom full of threads and been asked to organize the colors and lines to find my way. Complete overload. Here was one way of visualizing that sensation. I stared at it for a while, overnight too. But it wasn’t speaking loudly enough to me.

In effort 2, I began the process of somehow enriching the experience in a way that made it more complex. Adding lines and areas of color that created a sense of evening, introduces a curved-dome suggesting a church, introduced an intense color area at the bottom suggesting the street level where most of the color happens. And of course added a suggeston of the Zachem bridge in the background.

Another day and night goes by as I evaluate it’s chances of seeing the light of a gallery wall. It could have been a keeper, but I was not satisfied yet. Out came the scrub brush. (I have heard many friends say you wiped that out? I love  that one! How could you? Ughh. It is after all my sense of what is right…right?)  After hours of work it is always a tough decision to either keep it, rework it, or completely smudge and smear til it gets to a point where I feel I have a base to move ahead again.

After the scrub

Third effort: Boldly applied acrylic now creates repeat pattern and underlying structure or foundation for me to play. You’ll notice the final painting is rotated 180 degrees from this version.

And so away it went. Scrubbed into a neutral blue gray gritty-looking background of texture and color. Now that was a surface I could work with. What did I want to say about the city? I am always impressed by the color as it contrasts with the stone grays of building materials found all over any city. Granite, limestone, pavement, cement, dust, dirt, smoke, hazy skies, misty air. Then there are the signs–retail, traffic, business, sandwich boards, all vying for attention while creating a cacophony of noise and distraction and confusion. That’s what I’ll paint about. And while I’m at it I’ll rotate the painting canvas to a bold horizontal where the expanse sideways will be as powerful as the vertical thrusts of the building/street lines. Now we’re talking. Me and my canvas.

detail of Spirit of Grit

Detail of process pic of Spirit of Grit.

I selected complementary colors of oranges and reds to contrast with the blues of the background hoping to heighten the busyness effect of the concept. A night and day notion–where there doesn’t seem to be much difference when living in the city–is represented by the dominant white building/street/subway-like line through the middle linking foreground and background imagery. Curves of a sky area reflects into a waterway representing moonlight blue evening sky. Traffic signal light at lower left adds a playful bit of color suggesting stopping, slowing and going are all part of the city life.

Hope you’ve enjoyed this glimpse into my process no matter where you thought I should have stopped. Now I must go…

Painting on top of a painting. Almost final...

Painting on top of a painting. Almost final…

Edit October 2014: After looking at this piece, I decided it needed more work. The top image of this post reflects the new final piece.

 

Details Inspire Large Work

High key colors in body ofwater with small sailboat imagery

Playing with heavy textures in my customary coastal theme.

Last summer I did a painting titled, Raking Light, a 36×36 that described a late afternoon low tide at a sandy beach in Provincetown. One small area of the painting approx. 5×5  inspired this enlargement at 24×24. I loved how the coarseness of the under-texture allowed the acrylic paint to sit up on top of the raised areas. And adding other color layers allowed those underneath to still peek through. Having fun creating new works this endless winter using this idea. No title as of yet. Ideas?

Detail that inspired new work

Detail that inspired new work

Story Island begins in Maine

Preliminary sketch on canvas of segmented/chapters of 36x36 painting.

Preliminary sketch on canvas of segments/chapters

Determining color scheme along the way, not pre-thought.

Determining color scheme along the way, not pre-thought.

Final look at the painting process 36x36, acrylic on canvas.

Final look at the painting process 36×36, acrylic on canvas.

In this painting there are 8 segments, each could be a small painting on its own but I have opted to build all these into one large 36×36 to see if I could unify all pieces together on one panel. I have done small paintings of the segments in the past using other color schemes and slightly different designs. But putting them all together in a block-like fashion and hoping to retain a sense of order–not in a chronological or book style– but in a way that allows the viewer to make up their own idea of what this piece is saying to them. See more of my art at www.anntrainordomingue.com or sign up to stay informed on my FB Art Page at www.Facebook/anntrainordomingueart  Ann Trainor Domingue, messy, uncommon, friendly contemporary art inspired by but not beholden to the New England landscape.

JoP Research Journal

2017 -> Visual Research Journal with spelling mistakes and links to image sources

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