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17618 Woven Into Life mixed media acrylic 12x12 sm

Woven Into Life, mixed media acrylic, 12×12 

Its amazing how many things in the news, on television, on websites, on social media feeds, in email, on tablets, and on our phones seem so much more important than things that really matter. Like face to face conversations, talking out loud not in the silence of a phone text, listening to the tone of voice in a conversation can be more meaningful than a long winded conversation. And when looking at artwork a quiet thought about what the artist was intending can be an interesting way to spend a moment or two.

In our digital impersonal age I try to remember to be sure to communicate with family, friends, and strangers in the old-fashioned way. With a smile and a hello, it surprises me how many people don’t expect you to say hello today. But they reply in kind and usually continue the conversation even if it is small talk. Small talk can lead to bigger and better things. And interacting with the thought process of an artist can yield something that matters as well.

Lesson learned: I asked a collector what drew him to this piece of art and he responded with something I didn’t intend in this piece. I intended a couple inside their ‘home’ awaiting the birth of their child and how wonderful and amazing it is. He recognized that too but also more importantly was the dark-skinned ethnicity of the male figure exemplifying a broader world view was what touched him. I just never know. I’m sure the impending birth of another grandchild this week has prompted this post.



Sketching Small is Big


I’m happy to help friend and artist (and musician) in promoting her new ‘Field Artista’ compact portable watercolor sketching kit.  I have been working with it and it is a fun little set—includes a small sponge, two short shaft soft hair paint brushes, and 12 colors. Two fold-out palettes are very handy and an additional small metal screw cap water holder can be clipped onto one of the palettes keeping a small amount of water right where you need it. Good range of 12 watercolors that rewet quickly provide broad mixing possibilities.

The biggest advantage of this set is its small sizeable to be used in inconspicuous settings such as coffee shops, bars or restaurants—or from the seat of your car. Easily sketch with your favorite pen or pencil and then add bold or subtle color—or vice versa. Beginner or experienced artists will find this little set is just the right size to get you started on a fun pastime or provide a new approach for your serious work. Very reasonably priced as well and sold on Amazon at $29.99. Hope you’ll check it out!  And please share with your artist friends, thank you.

So go sketch from life, or work out designs for larger artworks, or…

(photo shows a small plastic cup-not included in kit)

(Blue fountain pen is found at The Goulet Pen Company)

It Takes a Village, Too

Sometimes one painting moves right into the next. First ‘Village’ sold immediately, so I did the above painting with a different coloration and details. Again, much positive feedback. So, I’ll keep going down this path for a while. 

(It Takes a Village, Too. 30×30, acrylic on canvas.) Available now at Kennedy Gallery, Portsmouth. 

Same But Different


Detail: Looking Ahead, 24×12, acrylic on panel. Work in progress…

As I close out a successful 2016—a year of new experiences, influences, opportunities and friendships, I look ahead to 2017 as I incorporate these things into new work. Based on my previous work for sure but handled differently as I work to push my imagery and paint handling into somewhat different areas. Fish and fishermen will be prevalent, coastal imagery and inland will be integrated. Farms and sheep may appear from time to time. Buildings and people will also make an appearance. All in a days work, or should I say year’s work.

In the early spring you’ll see a new ‘animal’ gracing a page of a Maine magazine as I explored a new opportunity via my Camden Falls Gallery. My work will appear in the Art Collector Maine Portland, Art Maine annual guide 2017, and my originals and now prints and cards are available at Kennedy Gallery and Framing in Portsmouth, NH, and I’ll have a solo show there in 2017.

So many things to be thankful for as I head into the new year—another grandchild in March, too. Winter is my favorite time to paint in my studio, no matter how high the snow gets. Hope you have a Healthy and Happy New Year!


Embracing Family, Embracing Series


Every Which Way, 24×36, acrylic


Pattern in Blues, 24×36, acrylic


Time of Day, 24×24, acrylic.

Its taken me some time to really embrace the idea of working in a series. I understand the concept and can readily see it in other artists’ work, but have consistently had difficulties adopting this idea in developing my own work, until now. The examples above show my recent attempts at exploring elements of my work and producing new works that embody aspects related to one another. Sort of like a family of children who look very similar, but are unique in their own way. Here’s where it has been tough for me. My background as an illustrator has given me broad skills to create just about anything. But that is not necessarily helpful in my career as a painter. Here’s what I’ve learned.

My extended family reaches far into the world as we have welcomed the changes life brings, and all is well. Marriages, divorces, friends, godchildren, distant relatives–not unlike many of you I’m sure. As relationships relate to my artwork though it sometimes appears as though I’ve adopted children from another planet, never mind my own world. So I have found it helpful to model my new found attention to working in a series after my family. Now it makes a bit more sense as I develop new art—as I choose which aspects to retain, and which to remember as an important lesson.

Finding the core element of the New England landscape (my lifelong home area) has been key to creating an armature/home where I can then change details while keeping a foundation in place. I’ll proceed into the New Year 2017 with a blueprint–one where I will still be able to enjoy serendipitous happenings as I evaluate new ideas to keep my family of work warm and cozy.

Hope you and your family have a wonderful Christmas and Happy New Year. And as always, thank you for your continued support.


(If interested in any of these artworks, consult my website or contact me directly.)


Love New England? So do I.


I’d love to meet you and have you browse my New England-inspired paintings– whether you are an art collector, a ‘just looking’ new fan, considering a first purchase of art that you love, or are simply curious about the lifestyle of an artist. Stop by. Go to Open Doors NH for directions, select Merrimack Region, fine art listings.

Original art is treasured by families through the generations and I’d love to talk with you about creating a commissioned/custom piece that will become just that.

Discover more at Ann Trainor Domingue website. But it will be way more fun to stop by my Open Studio!

Design New England Sept/Oct 2016

I am so proud to have been selected by DNE Magazine published by the Boston Globe to be profiled in this issue. ‘Painting Joy’ is an accurate take on where I currently am in my art career. Ever evolving and always surprising. This kind of exposure for my work in invaluable and I appreciate the opportunity immensely. Thanks to Lori Ferguson for writing such an engaging article and to Russ Mezikovsky for the beautiful photos. And for bringing his entertaining young kids which helped me relax during the photoshoot.


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Superhero to the Rescue


My hometown means a lot to me and I volunteer time and effort toward worthy projects. This poster is one of those. Our local Goffstown Main Street Program needed an event marketing poster–fast! My ‘previous’ career as a graphic designer/illustrator/art director kicked into gear. Yes, it took me away from painting and prepping for my Open Studio scheduled for Nov. 5&6, but it was a priority for me to see this local org succeed by helping promote the goodness and fun of our beautiful little town.

P.S. This may answer why I hear so many comments like: ‘I like the whimsy of your art’ or  ‘your art makes me smile’. I just can’t hide it even when I am doing my ‘professional’ painting work.

My treasure, someone else’s trash


Found along back road of Concord/Bow NH

Broken down, unpainted, overgrown, rusty, messy. All the right elements for me to put on the brakes and stop the car.

Listed in no particular order: variety of warm and cool grays, strong verticals of trees and barn boards, haphazardly placed metal roofing piece, way-passed-usefulness–except for an artist–pickup truck, early fall dried branches of overgrown weeds and brambles that soften the hard edges of the non-natural forms of the truck and trash. And the splash of blue tarp color always a must.

No real plans for this beauty yet, but the wheels are turning…


Do Your Job, artists. A Labor Day note.

do my job image sm

The highly successful football coach of the New England Patriots, Bill Belichick, adopted ‘Do Your Job’ as the motivational mantra for the 2014/15 team. You wouldn’t think a statement like this would be necessary for a group of super-athletes to go out and be a winning football team. But the success of Coach Belichick proves that even the big boys—really big boys—still need something to focus on, that cuts through the glut of distractions, and focuses a laser beam on what is expected of them.

Simple, right? Do Your Job. As artists we can be the epitomy of distraction. As author Steven Pressfield writes in The War of Art, “What keeps us from sitting down (to our job/work) is resistance”. Paraphrased, resistance comes in so many forms—avoidance, distractions, low self-confidence. We feel it’s negative force. It prevents us from doing our work. (I recommend reading The War of Art, wish I had found it many years ago.)

For instance the following are my forms of resistance: family, grandchildren, shopping, photography, reading, baseball, basketball, football, exercising, cooking, music, guitar, travel, volunteering, church, sightseeing, gardening, road trips, phone, computers, social-mediaing, marketing, learning about illustrating children’s books, long walks on the beach :), beach combing, sketching, staring, sleeping, sewing, antiquing, cleaning, sorting through art supplies, finding photos, etc. None of the above is my job. They are all important interests and have an influence on my job. But my actual job is not on this list, think of all the time spent not on my job.

“I am a painter. Do My Job. Paint.”


Make a nice clear sign for your art studio. No embellishments. Futura Bold Extra Condensed for my typeface fans out there. ‘Do My Job’ during your most energy-filled time of day, then everything else.

Wishing you all the best in doing your job. Enjoy your Labor Day.

A family farm in Goffstown NH

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Messy, uncommon, friendly contemporary landscape paintings inspired by the New England landscape

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Art and creativity with a touch of nature

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Thinking about design every day

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Messy, uncommon, friendly contemporary landscape paintings inspired by the New England landscape

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