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Posts from the ‘artist’ Category

Do Your Job, artists. A Labor Day note.

do my job image sm

The highly successful football coach of the New England Patriots, Bill Belichick, adopted ‘Do Your Job’ as the motivational mantra for the 2014/15 team. You wouldn’t think a statement like this would be necessary for a group of super-athletes to go out and be a winning football team. But the success of Coach Belichick proves that even the big boys—really big boys—still need something to focus on, that cuts through the glut of distractions, and focuses a laser beam on what is expected of them.

Simple, right? Do Your Job. As artists we can be the epitomy of distraction. As author Steven Pressfield writes in The War of Art, “What keeps us from sitting down (to our job/work) is resistance”. Paraphrased, resistance comes in so many forms—avoidance, distractions, low self-confidence. We feel it’s negative force. It prevents us from doing our work. (I recommend reading The War of Art, wish I had found it many years ago.)

For instance the following are my forms of resistance: family, grandchildren, shopping, photography, reading, baseball, basketball, football, exercising, cooking, music, guitar, travel, volunteering, church, sightseeing, gardening, road trips, phone, computers, social-mediaing, marketing, learning about illustrating children’s books, long walks on the beach :), beach combing, sketching, staring, sleeping, sewing, antiquing, cleaning, sorting through art supplies, finding photos, etc. None of the above is my job. They are all important interests and have an influence on my job. But my actual job is not on this list, think of all the time spent not on my job.

“I am a painter. Do My Job. Paint.”

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Make a nice clear sign for your art studio. No embellishments. Futura Bold Extra Condensed for my typeface fans out there. ‘Do My Job’ during your most energy-filled time of day, then everything else.

Wishing you all the best in doing your job. Enjoy your Labor Day.

 

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Copley Society of Art Boston opening

16467 Autumn Near and Far acryl fabr on canv 54x36 cs

Autumn Near and Far, acrylic and fabric on canvas, 52×32, gallery wrap, Ann Trainor Domingue

Opening reception for Copley Fellows exhibition, Thursday, May 19, 2016 at Copley Society of Art, 136 Newbury Street, Boston, MA, 5:30-7:30. Meet six Copley Fellows who were selected to complete an artist residency at either Cape Ann, MA or the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, MA. Talk with the artists and discover how our experiences have influenced our current works. Some of us have realized big changes while others are more subtle. We’d love to have you visit the opening, chat about our work, and learn a thing or two about what makes each of us unique. Thank you.

Participating artists are: Ann Trainor Domingue,  Barbara Leiner Greenstein, Eli Cedrone, Abby Lammers, Page Railsback and Gail Sauter.

Bloomin’ Tunes Together

Quick note about starting a new painting series while retaining some of your current art work elements.

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One Red Boat, Endless Painting Options

As artists we are always on the look out for things that capture our attention. We may not know what we are going to do with that little tidbit at the moment but we file it away for future use. And yes, we forget about them sometimes. But as an individual artist we tend to notice similar things, over and over. And therein lies the key.

Very coarsely-painted beginning

Very coarsely-painted beginning

Not sure who said it but “notice what you notice” is such a great statement. Especially if you are an artist looking for direction. Randomness is not an asset when it comes to defining who you are as an artist. Maybe at a later more experienced point it will be, but not at the outset. Looking intensely at a series of photos you’ve taken, making notes of what interests you in the landscape or people-scapes around you. Look for the pattern created when you go out for a walk–are you looking at minute details of flowers, or rolling hillsides, or how the light shines through the woods. The sooner you find your personal pattern, the more directed you can be in your artistic development.

Using the rough sketch to develop painting design further

Using the rough sketch to develop painting design further

For me, the coastal waterfront and all its details have been at the very top of my list. Early on impressive sunrises and sunsets were at the very top. I loved them, but did not necessarily want to paint about them. So many people were already doing that. I wanted to paint about things differently and add something that gave the viewer more information about the things I find important.

A red-colored work boat in Provincetown harbor provided the needed intensity to dive into this subject in various ways and create some final paintings. Even after many years I am still intrigued by this working pier in Provincetown. The activity, the aged boats that still work every day, the people who go out on the sea day after day–I admire them for their bravery. I once thought I would like that life but have since come to my senses. Seasickness and I are companions unfortunately but I still love being on the water when I can. So even a landlubber can have great appreciation for things connected to the sea. I have plans to explore this motif and weave in some themes of connectedness, friendship and awe. To be continued…

Closeup look at detail of a 24x24 painting depicting the simple drama of red against blues.

Closeup look at detail of a 24×24 painting depicting the simple drama of red against blues.

Springtime Sketching in Boston

comparison May 2015 Trinity Church May 2015

In a city like Boston, there are so many beautiful options for sketching and painting that it takes quite some time to make a decision. In a plein air event like this–painting direct from nature outdoors– painters must decide quickly where they will spend their day or risk running out of time. For a painter, the chance of losing the shadows or lighting conditions are what pressures us to settle on a view and get to work. I spent about 30 minutes walking near Trinity Church looking for a position detail of drawingthat gave a me a broad view of the main facade, was away from dangerous traffic, had some shade for me to sit in if need be, and was not located too far from the Copley Society of Art gallery in case nature called. I had great fun doing this piece although it was chilly and windy. Nice to hear that someone bid on this piece at the Auction held May 8th. Thank you to whoever you are. Visit my painting website at www.anntrainordomingue.com

Hidden by the Summer

P1080832The change of seasons in New England covers and uncovers a wealth of beauty. This photo is an excellent example of what is not seen during a spectacular summer day. Thick layers of trees with branches full of fluttering leaves, yellow and blue greens of every tint and tone, neutral grays of tree barks are woven together blocking the distant view of the purple-blue mountains. Early spring reveals the complexity of woods and beauty of the cooler colors of moisture-laden air of the mountain air. You’ll notice this motif in many of my recent paintings.  www.anntrainordomingue.com

One snapshot = a boatload of paintings

Provincetown Compare 2a

From snapshot, to sketch, to final painting–here’s a sample of how I create my paintings. Not all happen this way but this is a process I find captures an inspiration, allows me to mull over the possibilities, and then sketch options and try out with various media. I generally do not know the color palette I will use when I begin to paint. I will have one key idea about the focal area that I want to retain and then I let the process of painting take over. I’ll make many decisions on the fly. some good. Some not so good. Exploring without knowing my end goal is my idea of great fun while creating each artwork. Visit my website to see more www.anntrainordomingue.com or email me at domingue@comcast.net to receive my newsletter.

Coexist: Plein Air and Studio Air

June post 2013

We artists have so many options open to us as we design a new piece of art. This one is less real and more abstract or is it more real and less abstract. Let me explain. I love working with the landscape–New England, Caribbean and beyond– and that does not always mean working directly in front of it–plein air–as it is commonly known. I enjoy the process of interpreting the things that have inspired me and reworking into artworks that speak the language of the landscape but also let my personal interpretations in as well. I appreciate the time and efforts–and suffering–many of my painter friends put in for the sake of their art. For me I do plein air for other reasons, not to produce a final piece of art but to learn from the landscape of that day–to practice mixing colors, to see subtle tones, to work despite less than ideal conditions, to sketch quickly my impressions, to get out of the studio and get some fresh air–and perspective. My personal art process uses both the plein air experience and the studio experience to create art unique to me. If anything, I admit I am a fairweather plein air painter.

For purchase and/or more information please visit www.anntrainordomingue.com orwww.facebook.com/anntrainordomingueart for regular updates. Thanks in advance for sharing my work.

One Sun, Two Loves

One Sun, Two Loves sm

This is the final day of the 30 paintings 30 days challenge from artist/blogger Leslie Saeta. Although I didn’t get all thirty paintings posted, the challenge has jump started my year and I am happy for that little push. I have posted more on my blog than usual finding that I could actually write faster and show a work in progress or final piece. I tend to wait til it is totally finished before letting it out in the world. But there is something to be said for letting people see the “struggle” of a piece too. This piece was conceived while sitting in an airport waiting for a flight back to cold NH. I thought how lovely the warm air had been in Florida visiting my gallery Galerie du Soleil in Naples. So this snowbird idea came to me–how could I show both FL and NH landscapes in one painting. And here is my first effort at doing just that. Let me now your thoughts!  24×48, acrylic on canvas, One Sun, Two Loves.

Schooner Backlit

Schooner Backlit sm2
Schooner Backlit is an 8×10 study based on sketches I completed while on a whale watch boat in Provincetown Harbor, Cape Cod, MA. The whale boat was positioned so several artists could get a close up look at a schooner race from Gloucester, MA to Provincetown in September 2014. I loved seeing the beautiful curves of the sails, and subtle and various whites as they they glided by. Lucky for us the wind was light so we had a good amount of time to stare and record what interested us. Not sure I will go larger with this one but I enjoyed using more subtle colors than I might usually select.

This post is day 29, part of the 30 paintings/30 days challenge presented by Leslie Saeta on her blog,http://www.lesliesaeta.blogspot.com I didn’t post all 30 but I have done many new small works as a result of this challenge.

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